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I've wanted a 10mm for a hundred years but having 5 pistols it's hard to justify

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@ bbqit if justification and need had anything to do with it I'd be screwed. lol

Kimber 10mm

Walther P22

Colt 1991A1 .45ACP

Browning Hi-power 9mm

Ruger GP100 .357

Sig P320 Full Size 9mm

Sig P320 Compact 9mm

S&W Bodyguard 380 .380ACP

Glock 21 45ACP

And here I am looking at another 1911 in .45, and have a Ruger Single Six, CZ-75 and quite a few others on my want list

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Got to handle the Wiley Clapp this afternoon. Was not fond. Odd grip profile on it.

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Speaking of Mossberg, I bought one of these the other day and it's on its way to me right now...

813cf2c9-b93f-4eb7-9141-b65d2bbe0a19_zps7pxpion4.jpg

Mossberg Patriot Dangerous Game Rifle in .375 Ruger, marinecoat and synthetic stock. http://www.mossberg.com/category/series/mossberg-patriot/

Now this is one of those I waited awhile to see how it performed, being a little skeptical about Mossberg bolt-actions, especially those under $400.

But it seems to be a resounding success at this point; it's almost impossible to get one, as the day I got mine I had been waiting months for various websites to e-mail me they were back in stock... that day 6 online gun stores had them in stock; 2 days later they were all gone, and that's typical.

Anyway, I wanted to know about use at the bench and in the field; and reviews were outstanding in both...

Cloverleaf Accuracy

The action cycled smoothly for me, and the gun fed and ejected without any issues. The rifle’s accuracy is also excellent. Though shooting the Patriot off the bench wasn’t pleasant, the tiny groups it made at 100 yards were as lovely as you could ask for. Three-shot groups, using three different bullet weights and styles, averaged 0.896 inches. The smallest group was 0.571 inches, using Hornady’s 250-grain GMX round.

http://www.range365....rous-game-rifle

Boddington in G&A 9-2015

When I saw the first Patriot, I liked it. It handled like a dream. The action was smooth, and Mossberg's LBA trigger with trigger safety is superb. The stippling gave a very positive grip and feel, even with gloves.

You already know that I recently took it along on a polar bear hunt, but I want to take a moment to explain the rationale. The polar bear hunt was my hunt, a bucket-list adventure I'd been planning with outfitter Shane Black (Canada North Outfitting) for several years. I hadn't fully decided what I would use until I saw the Patriot .375, and I chose it because I liked this rifle that much. I had already determined from my bear-hunting experience that the .375 was the proper tool. Aside from the fact that the Patriot felt good in my hands, this light, short .375 was excellent for carrying on a komatak (sled) or storing in case of emergency while residing in a small, crowded tent on the attic ice. In Marinecote and laminate, it is also wonderfully weatherproof and ideal for any hunting in Canada or Alaska where a .375 makes sense (such as hunting bear). As to the latter, well, I would be trusting my life that this rifle would perform.

Groups and Scores I'd long since decided on the Hornady load. I liked the velocity and trajectory of Hornady's 250-grain GMX bullet, just in case I needed to reach out a bit. I wasn't worried about performance of the light-for-caliber GMX design; I knew it would penetrate. Sighting equipment was the next concern. I thought about it a lot and decided that fast and close were more critical than utmost precision and that compactness was a desirable attribute. For its fast action, I mounted an Aimpoint. In this case, I opted for the new Micro H-2. The Micro is a tiny little sight that nestled perfectly on the front receiver mount.

The Micro H-2 wasn't yet available when I started range work, so I actually hedged my bets. Initial groups were shot with an Aimpoint Hunter and a Leupold VX-3 3.5-10x40mm scope. Groups with the Leupold were shot at 100 yards; groups with the red dot sights were shot at 50 yards. Understanding there was limited selection in loads, 100-yard five-shot groups ran a very nice 1 to 1.25 inches; 50-yard groups with the Aimpoint were about a half-inch. The rifle shot as well as it looked and felt.

The Patriot is a simple rifle, with a two-position safety behind the bolt handle root and a free-floated barrel. It is worth pointing out that, to my knowledge, this Patriot is the lightest and most compact .375 on the market. It is also the most economical (by quite a margin), with a suggested retail of only $584.

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Mossberg%27s+first+bigbore%3a+meet+the+new+Patriot+in+.375+Ruger.-a0425350123

I keep a .45-70 as my truck gun, and it's more than adequate as a camp rifle in big-critter areas; but I've always wanted something capable of taking the biggest and baddest on the planet, and to be honest, just for kicks and giggles on the range, too. Doubt I'll ever go on African safari, but camping and hiking in Alaska and territories with big grizzlies is a given... those trips will take place for certain.

For those that haven't heard of it, the .375 Ruger is like a souped-up .375 H&H or .375 RUM, but it uses a standard length cartridge and no belt; so despite being more powerful than both, it can be used in standard length actions like a .30-06.

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Got to handle the Wiley Clapp this afternoon. Was not fond. Odd grip profile on it.

Interesting you'd think its feel identical. I want a trp or valor

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Interesting you'd think its feel identical. I want a trp or valor

Yeah not the grip, the grips if that makes sense. Instead of being symmetrical front to back, they're fatter at the rear.

For some reason my lgs only had one lonely SA GI in stock so I didn't get to finger any of those.

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Speaking of Mossberg, I bought one of these the other day and it's on its way to me right now...

813cf2c9-b93f-4eb7-9141-b65d2bbe0a19_zps7pxpion4.jpg

Mossberg Patriot Dangerous Game Rifle in .375 Ruger, marinecoat and synthetic stock. http://www.mossberg.com/category/series/mossberg-patriot/

Now this is one of those I waited awhile to see how it performed, being a little skeptical about Mossberg bolt-actions, especially those under $400.

But it seems to be a resounding success at this point; it's almost impossible to get one, as the day I got mine I had been waiting months for various websites to e-mail me they were back in stock... that day 6 online gun stores had them in stock; 2 days later they were all gone, and that's typical.

Anyway, I wanted to know about use at the bench and in the field; and reviews were outstanding in both...

Cloverleaf Accuracy

The action cycled smoothly for me, and the gun fed and ejected without any issues. The rifle’s accuracy is also excellent. Though shooting the Patriot off the bench wasn’t pleasant, the tiny groups it made at 100 yards were as lovely as you could ask for. Three-shot groups, using three different bullet weights and styles, averaged 0.896 inches. The smallest group was 0.571 inches, using Hornady’s 250-grain GMX round.

http://www.range365....rous-game-rifle

Boddington in G&A 9-2015

When I saw the first Patriot, I liked it. It handled like a dream. The action was smooth, and Mossberg's LBA trigger with trigger safety is superb. The stippling gave a very positive grip and feel, even with gloves.

You already know that I recently took it along on a polar bear hunt, but I want to take a moment to explain the rationale. The polar bear hunt was my hunt, a bucket-list adventure I'd been planning with outfitter Shane Black (Canada North Outfitting) for several years. I hadn't fully decided what I would use until I saw the Patriot .375, and I chose it because I liked this rifle that much. I had already determined from my bear-hunting experience that the .375 was the proper tool. Aside from the fact that the Patriot felt good in my hands, this light, short .375 was excellent for carrying on a komatak (sled) or storing in case of emergency while residing in a small, crowded tent on the attic ice. In Marinecote and laminate, it is also wonderfully weatherproof and ideal for any hunting in Canada or Alaska where a .375 makes sense (such as hunting bear). As to the latter, well, I would be trusting my life that this rifle would perform.

Groups and Scores I'd long since decided on the Hornady load. I liked the velocity and trajectory of Hornady's 250-grain GMX bullet, just in case I needed to reach out a bit. I wasn't worried about performance of the light-for-caliber GMX design; I knew it would penetrate. Sighting equipment was the next concern. I thought about it a lot and decided that fast and close were more critical than utmost precision and that compactness was a desirable attribute. For its fast action, I mounted an Aimpoint. In this case, I opted for the new Micro H-2. The Micro is a tiny little sight that nestled perfectly on the front receiver mount.

The Micro H-2 wasn't yet available when I started range work, so I actually hedged my bets. Initial groups were shot with an Aimpoint Hunter and a Leupold VX-3 3.5-10x40mm scope. Groups with the Leupold were shot at 100 yards; groups with the red dot sights were shot at 50 yards. Understanding there was limited selection in loads, 100-yard five-shot groups ran a very nice 1 to 1.25 inches; 50-yard groups with the Aimpoint were about a half-inch. The rifle shot as well as it looked and felt.

The Patriot is a simple rifle, with a two-position safety behind the bolt handle root and a free-floated barrel. It is worth pointing out that, to my knowledge, this Patriot is the lightest and most compact .375 on the market. It is also the most economical (by quite a margin), with a suggested retail of only $584.

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Mossberg%27s+first+bigbore%3a+meet+the+new+Patriot+in+.375+Ruger.-a0425350123

I keep a .45-70 as my truck gun, and it's more than adequate as a camp rifle in big-critter areas; but I've always wanted something capable of taking the biggest and baddest on the planet, and to be honest, just for kicks and giggles on the range, too. Doubt I'll ever go on African safari, but camping and hiking in Alaska and territories with big grizzlies is a given... those trips will take place for certain.

For those that haven't heard of it, the .375 Ruger is like a souped-up .375 H&H or .375 RUM, but it uses a standard length cartridge and no belt; so despite being more powerful than both, it can be used in standard length actions like a .30-06.

375 Ruger is a heck of a round. Hits above its weight from what I understand.

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375 Ruger is a heck of a round. Hits above its weight from what I understand.

Yeah, collaboration between Ruger and Hornady, which is why they're the only 2 offering ammo for it right now; as more companies offer rifles chambered in it I expect other manufacturers to offer ammunition and the price to go down... box of 20 in any of 250, 270, or the 300 grainers is about $50. This isn't one you'd shoot all day at the range anyway because of the recoil, so no fear of shooting up $100 of ammo in a range session.

I did some comparisons of the .375 Ruger, .375 H&H, and .375 Remington Ultra Mag rounds. The H&H and RUM are Remington cartridges and the Ruger is a Hornady...

270 Grain

Round -------- BC --- Muzzle -------- 100 ----------- 200 ---------- 300 ----------- 400 ---------- 500

.375 H&H --- .267 - 2690/4338 - 2363/3347 - 2060/2543 - 1780/1900 - 1530/1403

.375 RUM -- .267 - 2900/5041 - 2558/3922 - 2241/3010 - 1947/2272 - 1678/1689

.375 Ruger - .380 - 2840/4835 - 2600/4052 - 2372/3373 - 2156/2786 - 1951/2283 - 1759/1855

Notice at the muzzle, the .375 RUM has a slight advantage, but because of its better BC the .375 Ruger has left it behind by 100 yards, and the velocity and energy difference keeps increasing until by 400 yards the Ruger is traveling nearly 300 fps faster and delivering 600 more fpe.. Also, despite the other cartridge cases being longer, the Ruger actually has greater capacity because they raised the shoulder significantly, providing more room.

Since I don't intend to hunt at extreme long distances, but want a defensive round at relatively close range for pissed off big bears, I ordered a box of the Hornady Superformance dangerous game, flat-point, 300 gr. solids with the rifle; looks like a real sledgehammer...

300 Grain

Round -------- BC ----- Muzzle -------- 100 ----------- 200 ---------- 300 ----------- 400 ---------- 500

.375 Ruger - .275 -- 2660/4713 - 2344/3660 - 2050/2800 - 1780/2110 - 1536/1572 - 1328/1174

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Yeah not the grip, the grips if that makes sense. Instead of being symmetrical front to back, they're fatter at the rear.

For some reason my lgs only had one lonely SA GI in stock so I didn't get to finger any of those.

Could you not just change the grips out for $30?

Trp is tough to find. Springfield runs their production one model at a time so they may go months without making a specific model especially the higher end models that are hand fitted like the trp. You can find mil specs and loadeds all day long because they are just production runs with little hands on fitting.

Valor is made by Dan wesson. Or CZ as most know it. Even harder to find at a lgs

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Could you not just change the grips out for $30?

Trp is tough to find. Springfield runs their production one model at a time so they may go months without making a specific model especially the higher end models that are hand fitted like the trp. You can find mil specs and loadeds all day long because they are just production runs with little hands on fitting.

Valor is made by Dan wesson. Or CZ as most know it. Even harder to find at a lgs

Could but if I drop 1200 on a pistol I don't care to modify much. If I'm gonna mod I'll start with the colt competition at 900.

I was just shocked that they only had one sa. Usually they have a whole case full.

Lgs did have some Dan wessons. They were all out of my budget for this buy so I didn't handle them. Didn't want to talk myself into a budget buster like I've done many times before lol

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Could but if I drop 1200 on a pistol I don't care to modify much. If I'm gonna mod I'll start with the colt competition at 900.

I was just shocked that they only had one sa. Usually they have a whole case full.

Lgs did have some Dan wessons. They were all out of my budget for this buy so I didn't handle them. Didn't want to talk myself into a budget buster like I've done many times before lol

I completely understand lol

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I completely understand lol

The kimber 10mm was a budget buster recently. Was gonna get a Glock 40 Mos for 600 and ended up dropping 1k on the kimber :P

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The kimber 10mm was a budget buster recently. Was gonna get a Glock 40 Mos for 600 and ended up dropping 1k on the kimber :P

What exactly makes the 10 mm the perfect round. I need some nerd out ballistic numbers lol

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What exactly makes the 10 mm the perfect round. I need some nerd out ballistic numbers lol

Just a good combo of diameter, energy and velocity, coupled with fairly high sectional density bullets.  Get 41 magnum performance levels out of it so nothing to sneeze at.  Most off the shelf loads don't even approach it's full specification pressure or performance. Have to go Underwood, double tap or buffalo bore to get it.Eta180gr bullet at 1300fps. https://www.underwoodammo.com/10mm-auto-180-grain-bonded-jacketed-hollow-point/

Edited by nova
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Just a good combo of diameter, energy and velocity, coupled with fairly high sectional density bullets.  Get 41 magnum performance levels out of it so nothing to sneeze at.  Most off the shelf loads don't even approach it's full specification pressure or performance. Have to go Underwood, double tap or buffalo bore to get it.Eta180gr bullet at 1300fps. https://www.underwoodammo.com/10mm-auto-180-grain-bonded-jacketed-hollow-point/

So basically it's an auto loaded .357 magnum but has too much recoil for most and that's why the .40 was created. But if properly loaded for such a 10mm is closer to a .44 ballisticly? That's inpressive

Edited by GoldenRebel
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So basically it's an auto loaded .357 magnum but has too much recoil for most and that's why the .40 was created. But if properly loaded for such a 10mm is closer to a .44 ballisticly? That's inpressive

Pretty much. With the hottest loads you can touch the bottom end of 44 performance. Decent amount of firepower in a handgun especially when you're talking about one of the high capacity ones. 15 rounds of 41 mag is nothing to sneeze at.

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Pretty much. With the hottest loads you can touch the bottom end of 44 performance. Decent amount of firepower in a handgun especially when you're talking about one of the high capacity ones. 15 rounds of 41 mag is nothing to sneeze at.

Sounds like a great gun for the woods in case you run into a wild coyote.

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Got a pretty good chuckle this morning. Obviously the .375 rifle has to go to my LGS/FFL; but the ammo came straight to my house via Fedex.

So I look on my stoop and there's a pretty big box sitting there; big enough that it didn't click immediately that it could be my ammo... just a box of 20 cartridges.

Cut it open and sure enough it's the ammo; and taking one out I can see why they needed such a big box and all that padding... it's almost comical. This is a Hornady 20/box of .375 Rugers next to a Hornady 20/box of .45-70's, which I always thought was a pretty stout, impressive-looking round. I apologize in advance for the lousy work-phone camera pics...

HornadyBigBores_zps5gt2hnih.jpg?t=1460055827

A .375 Ruger flanked by a Hunting Shack Munitions 430 gr. .45-70 Bear Load on the left and a Hornady 325 gr. .45-70 LeverEvolution on the right...

d28c9383-00be-4f9d-b0bd-cf8ae9554842_zpsa0ea2kb3.jpg?t=1460057082

The pic doesn't really do it justice; holding them in your hand, it's easy to see why the .375 produces around 5000 fpe and the .45-70 around 3000.

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That's awesome. Love big honking ammo.

Sounds like a great gun for the woods in case you run into a wild coyote.

Yah. Lotta people use em for woods guns. Good for anything short of grizzly.

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So basically it's an auto loaded .357 magnum but has too much recoil for most and that's why the .40 was created. But if properly loaded for such a 10mm is closer to a .44 ballisticly? That's inpressive

It didn't just have too much recoil for most people; it also had too much recoil and power for most guns, which contributed to its exit from the mainstream... very few semi-autos were capable of handling it; they were literally breaking and/or wearing out guns prematurely.

That's one of the reasons most factory ammo is downloaded for it these days... they had to water it down to preserve gun longevity. I think the original design called for a 200 gr. bullet at 1200 fps, but most factory loads are now 180 grs..

But gun makers have had a long time to perfect pistols for it, so as nova pointed out, you can get a lot more out of the round these days with less concern about the structural integrity of your gun.

Bottom line, more power always means more wear and tear on any gun; but the 10mm isn't something you'll go plinking with like a .22... so you can pretty much expect modern 10mm pistols to outlive you with just average use.

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I have some Brownings, Remingtons, and a Mossburg never really bird hunted enough to spend Benelli money but if you want a fast shotgun checkout the SX3 I got my boys a couple year before last.

The thing I am most anxious about this season isn't a gun.. it's four legged, brown spotted, will fetch for days, and man's best friend. I've been jealous of my buddies when we dove hunted they all had dogs now I got one if he isn't to spoiled by then.

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It didn't just have too much recoil for most people; it also had too much recoil and power for most guns, which contributed to its exit from the mainstream... very few semi-autos were capable of handling it; they were literally breaking and/or wearing out guns prematurely.

That's one of the reasons most factory ammo is downloaded for it these days... they had to water it down to preserve gun longevity. I think the original design called for a 200 gr. bullet at 1200 fps, but most factory loads are now 180 grs..

But gun makers have had a long time to perfect pistols for it, so as nova pointed out, you can get a lot more out of the round these days with less concern about the structural integrity of your gun.

Bottom line, more power always means more wear and tear on any gun; but the 10mm isn't something you'll go plinking with like a .22... so you can pretty much expect modern 10mm pistols to outlive you with just average use.

Didn't consider that. I'm sure the 1911 can handle it well. The glock prob not as much

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I have some Brownings, Remingtons, and a Mossburg never really bird hunted enough to spend Benelli money but if you want a fast shotgun checkout the SX3 I got my boys a couple year before last.

The thing I am most anxious about this season isn't a gun.. it's four legged, brown spotted, will fetch for days, and man's best friend. I've been jealous of my buddies when we dove hunted they all had dogs now I got one if he isn't to spoiled by then.

I always like those kinds of vids; check out Miculek doing mag dumps with a 930 SPX...

And before you ask, no, I can't duplicate any of that with my own 930 SPX. :D

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Didn't consider that. I'm sure the 1911 can handle it well. The glock prob not as much

Back at 10mm introduction even the 1911 had problems. Metallurgy just wasn't up to the task. Colt Delta elites were cracking slides like 1k rounds.

20 years down the road and Metallurgy has caught up. Basically any new pistol can handle full power loads without issue.

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