Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
JDawg

Huntin and Fishin Reports - Post Your Thoughts

210 posts in this topic

4 hours ago, GAMECOCK_FAN said:

I see deer on my property all the time.  Counted 10 when I looked out my back door a few weeks ago.  This area is covered with them.  Have to take it slow in the car when I get within a few miles of my house.

We did up until a few years ago. Would see 15-20 every hunt. Now, lucky to see one or two. And rarely seeing bucks.

Last two years I believe we had some kind of outbreak of bluetongue or something. Populations have really really been on the decline.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ept. of Health warns against eating deer meat in counties affected by CWD

Tuesday, February 13th 2018, 2:50 pm ESTTuesday, February 13th 2018, 3:58 pm EST
Posted by Morgan Howard, Digital Content Producer
CONNECT
 
 
  •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
 
 
Source: WLBTSource: WLBT
HINDS COUNTY, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

The Mississippi Department of Health is telling people not to eat the deer meat in counties possibly affected by Chronic Wasting Disease.

This disease is found in white tailed deer. A white-tailed deer in Issaquena County tested positive for the disease on January 25.

Effectively immediately, supplemental feeding is banned in the following counties:  Claiborne, Hinds, Issaquena, Sharkey, Warren, and Yazoo

RELATED: Chronic Wasting Disease confirmed in a Mississippi white-tailed deer

Chronic Wasting Disease is a disease found in the brain and nervous system in deer, elk, moose and other members of the deer family. It is similar to "mad cow" disease and is always deadly when it infects an animal.

So far, this disease only affects animals and not humans. However, health officials say it could be spread to people if they ate an infected deer.

That's why the health department is warning people in these affected counties to avoid eating deer meat. 

As a precaution, the CDC now recommends that hunters harvesting deer from areas with reported CWD should strongly consider having those animals tested before eating the meat.  However, CWD cannot be positively detected in muscle tissue such as processed meat. 

To be as safe as possible and prevent human exposure, health officials say that hunters should consider not eating venison from deer harvested within the CWD Management Zone as defined by the Mississippi Department of Wildlife Fisheries, and Parks.

Here are the guidelines from the Mississippi Department of Health.

  • Do not shoot, handle or eat meat from a deer that appears sick.
  • Wear latex or rubber gloves when field dressing your deer.
  • Bone out the meat from your animal. Don’t saw through bone, and avoid cutting through the brain or spinal cord (backbone).
  • Minimize the handling of brain and spinal tissues.
  • Wash hands and instruments thoroughly after field dressing is completed.
  • Avoid consuming brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils and lymph nodes of harvested animals. (Normal field dressing coupled with boning out a carcass will remove most, if not all, of these body parts. Cutting away all fatty tissue will remove remaining lymph nodes.)
  • Avoid consuming the meat from any animal that tests positive for the disease.
  • If you have your deer commercially processed, request that your animal is processed individually, without meat from other animals being added to meat from your animal.

For more information regarding CWD in Mississippi, call the Department at (601) 432-2199.

Copyright 2018 MSNewsNow. All rights reserv

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bigdaddydog1 said:

ept. of Health warns against eating deer meat in counties affected by CWD

Tuesday, February 13th 2018, 2:50 pm ESTTuesday, February 13th 2018, 3:58 pm EST
Posted by Morgan Howard, Digital Content Producer
CONNECT
 
 
  •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
 
 
Source: WLBTSource: WLBT
HINDS COUNTY, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

The Mississippi Department of Health is telling people not to eat the deer meat in counties possibly affected by Chronic Wasting Disease.

This disease is found in white tailed deer. A white-tailed deer in Issaquena County tested positive for the disease on January 25.

Effectively immediately, supplemental feeding is banned in the following counties:  Claiborne, Hinds, Issaquena, Sharkey, Warren, and Yazoo

RELATED: Chronic Wasting Disease confirmed in a Mississippi white-tailed deer

Chronic Wasting Disease is a disease found in the brain and nervous system in deer, elk, moose and other members of the deer family. It is similar to "mad cow" disease and is always deadly when it infects an animal.

So far, this disease only affects animals and not humans. However, health officials say it could be spread to people if they ate an infected deer.

That's why the health department is warning people in these affected counties to avoid eating deer meat. 

As a precaution, the CDC now recommends that hunters harvesting deer from areas with reported CWD should strongly consider having those animals tested before eating the meat.  However, CWD cannot be positively detected in muscle tissue such as processed meat. 

To be as safe as possible and prevent human exposure, health officials say that hunters should consider not eating venison from deer harvested within the CWD Management Zone as defined by the Mississippi Department of Wildlife Fisheries, and Parks.

Here are the guidelines from the Mississippi Department of Health.

  • Do not shoot, handle or eat meat from a deer that appears sick.
  • Wear latex or rubber gloves when field dressing your deer.
  • Bone out the meat from your animal. Don’t saw through bone, and avoid cutting through the brain or spinal cord (backbone).
  • Minimize the handling of brain and spinal tissues.
  • Wash hands and instruments thoroughly after field dressing is completed.
  • Avoid consuming brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils and lymph nodes of harvested animals. (Normal field dressing coupled with boning out a carcass will remove most, if not all, of these body parts. Cutting away all fatty tissue will remove remaining lymph nodes.)
  • Avoid consuming the meat from any animal that tests positive for the disease.
  • If you have your deer commercially processed, request that your animal is processed individually, without meat from other animals being added to meat from your animal.

For more information regarding CWD in Mississippi, call the Department at (601) 432-2199.

Copyright 2018 MSNewsNow. All rights reserv

Good info big guy,btw,possum wants to know if the butthole was off limits....

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, L.A.Hog said:

Good info big guy,btw,possum wants to know if the butthole was off limits....

Not in TENN  !!!

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The black panthers have invaded Franklin County Tennessee.   This photo was taken by home security in Alto last week.

BLACK PANTHER.jpg

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Noah said:

The black panthers have invaded Franklin County Tennessee.   This photo was taken by home security in Alto last week.

BLACK PANTHER.jpg

Have you seen where the black panthers terrorist org is suing the black panther movie?

 

Big cats have been seen in Moore county as well.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Bigdaddydog1 said:

Not in TENN  !!!

You’ve never tried possum chitterlings?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Bigdaddydog1 said:

ept. of Health warns against eating deer meat in counties affected by CWD

Tuesday, February 13th 2018, 2:50 pm ESTTuesday, February 13th 2018, 3:58 pm EST
Posted by Morgan Howard, Digital Content Producer
CONNECT
 
 
  •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
 
 
Source: WLBTSource: WLBT
HINDS COUNTY, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

The Mississippi Department of Health is telling people not to eat the deer meat in counties possibly affected by Chronic Wasting Disease.

This disease is found in white tailed deer. A white-tailed deer in Issaquena County tested positive for the disease on January 25.

Effectively immediately, supplemental feeding is banned in the following counties:  Claiborne, Hinds, Issaquena, Sharkey, Warren, and Yazoo

RELATED: Chronic Wasting Disease confirmed in a Mississippi white-tailed deer

Chronic Wasting Disease is a disease found in the brain and nervous system in deer, elk, moose and other members of the deer family. It is similar to "mad cow" disease and is always deadly when it infects an animal.

So far, this disease only affects animals and not humans. However, health officials say it could be spread to people if they ate an infected deer.

That's why the health department is warning people in these affected counties to avoid eating deer meat. 

As a precaution, the CDC now recommends that hunters harvesting deer from areas with reported CWD should strongly consider having those animals tested before eating the meat.  However, CWD cannot be positively detected in muscle tissue such as processed meat. 

To be as safe as possible and prevent human exposure, health officials say that hunters should consider not eating venison from deer harvested within the CWD Management Zone as defined by the Mississippi Department of Wildlife Fisheries, and Parks.

Here are the guidelines from the Mississippi Department of Health.

  • Do not shoot, handle or eat meat from a deer that appears sick.
  • Wear latex or rubber gloves when field dressing your deer.
  • Bone out the meat from your animal. Don’t saw through bone, and avoid cutting through the brain or spinal cord (backbone).
  • Minimize the handling of brain and spinal tissues.
  • Wash hands and instruments thoroughly after field dressing is completed.
  • Avoid consuming brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils and lymph nodes of harvested animals. (Normal field dressing coupled with boning out a carcass will remove most, if not all, of these body parts. Cutting away all fatty tissue will remove remaining lymph nodes.)
  • Avoid consuming the meat from any animal that tests positive for the disease.
  • If you have your deer commercially processed, request that your animal is processed individually, without meat from other animals being added to meat from your animal.

For more information regarding CWD in Mississippi, call the Department at (601) 432-2199.

Copyright 2018 MSNewsNow. All rights reserv

Been watching this. It’s our first case. It appears the deer has had the disease a couple years and nobody knows if it swam the river or somebody brought one in. They have caught several sneaking them in over the last few years. One guy from near here even tried to claim the state record. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, bbqit said:

Been watching this. It’s our first case. It appears the deer has had the disease a couple years and nobody knows if it swam the river or somebody brought one in. They have caught several sneaking them in over the last few years. One guy from near here even tried to claim the state record. 

Well, Maybe I am just paranoid but this sounds like it could turn out bad if it's not handled properly. Especially the feed plots where Deer gather, that would be a hot spot for spreading. Hopefully it will just die out and everything will be back to normal next hunting season.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bbqit said:

Been watching this. It’s our first case. It appears the deer has had the disease a couple years and nobody knows if it swam the river or somebody brought one in. They have caught several sneaking them in over the last few years. One guy from near here even tried to claim the state record. 

Don’t shoot deer that appear sick? I would think that would be a good move.?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, possumslayer said:

Don’t shoot deer that appear sick? I would think that would be a good move.?

The prions will get in the ground contaminating it. Plants that grow there become a carrier waiting to be nibbled on. Since this deer had the disease 2 or 3 years it’s safe to say more deer have it. Killing all the deer didn’t work in Wisconsin so I’m more in tune with controlling spread until a cure can be found. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bigdaddydog1 said:

Well, Maybe I am just paranoid but this sounds like it could turn out bad if it's not handled properly. Especially the feed plots where Deer gather, that would be a hot spot for spreading. Hopefully it will just die out and everything will be back to normal next hunting season.

It has not turned out good anywhere. Game and fish did their best to keep it out but folks just don’t listen and say damn the fines. No deer, live or dead, could be brought into the state without approval. If you killed one somewhere else the meat had to be processed by a game and fish licensed butcher and the mount had to be done the same by licensed taxidermist. Things had to be tested and treated before entering. Yet the lure of breeding different bucks for antlers became such big money folks didn’t care. Ark has it bad as do so many other states. We went a long time keeping it away but it found it’s way here

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, bbqit said:

It has not turned out good anywhere. Game and fish did their best to keep it out but folks just don’t listen and say damn the fines. No deer, live or dead, could be brought into the state without approval. If you killed one somewhere else the meat had to be processed by a game and fish licensed butcher and the mount had to be done the same by licensed taxidermist. Things had to be tested and treated before entering. Yet the lure of breeding different bucks for antlers became such big money folks didn’t care. Ark has it bad as do so many other states. We went a long time keeping it away but it found it’s way here

Infected animals begin to lose weight, lose their appetite, and develop an insatiable thirst.  They tend to stay away from herds, walk in patterns, carry their head low, salivate, and grind their teeth.

 

That Sounds like every Buck when he is the Rut.   

I'm not sure how many cases we have had-If any-(Time to Google)-But it sounds as if it could really complicate things for me. We eat a lot of deer meat.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, bbqit said:

It has not turned out good anywhere. Game and fish did their best to keep it out but folks just don’t listen and say damn the fines. No deer, live or dead, could be brought into the state without approval. If you killed one somewhere else the meat had to be processed by a game and fish licensed butcher and the mount had to be done the same by licensed taxidermist. Things had to be tested and treated before entering. Yet the lure of breeding different bucks for antlers became such big money folks didn’t care. Ark has it bad as do so many other states. We went a long time keeping it away but it found it’s way here

BBQ, are you in the affected area? I'm about 50mi southeast in Tensas Parish, and LWFD has asked Tensas, Madison, and East Carroll parishes to curtail feeding. This is the first I've read to not consume deer meat. I hate to throw away 5 fucking deer from this year.

Big Dog, Georgia doesn't have any confirmed cases of CWD.

being that symptoms don't appear for 1-2 years, and the disease is absorbed into the ground from dead carcasses, then into the local browse...and remains contaminated for 5-10 years.... we're fucked. I hope they allow us to send samples out for testing. 

crock of fucking shit.

 

@Bigdaddydog1

@bbqit

Edited by Booger
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, bbqit said:

The prions will get in the ground contaminating it. Plants that grow there become a carrier waiting to be nibbled on. Since this deer had the disease 2 or 3 years it’s safe to say more deer have it. Killing all the deer didn’t work in Wisconsin so I’m more in tune with controlling spread until a cure can be found. 

Damn, that’s a bad disease.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Booger said:

BBQ, are you in the affected area? I'm about 50mi southeast in Tensas Parish, and LWFD has asked Tensas, Madison, and East Carroll parishes to curtail feeding. This is the first I've read to not consume deer meat. I hate to throw away 5 fucking deer from this year.

Big Dog, Georgia doesn't have any confirmed cases of CWD.

being that symptoms don't appear for 1-2 years, and the disease is absorbed into the ground from dead carcasses, then into the local browse...and remains contaminated for 5-10 years.... we're fucked. I hope they allow us to send samples out for testing. 

crock of fucking shit.

 

@Bigdaddydog1

@bbqit

When I looked it up on Google it did not mention not to eat the meat. . Maybe that is just a precautionary. This is what I saw.

Because prions that cause bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, mad cow disease) are known to infect humans, there is concern that CWD might also cross the species barrier and cause a novel spongiform encephalopathy. Recent experimental results suggest that CWD prions are not likely to directly infecthumans.Mar 12, 2015

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Booger said:

BBQ, are you in the affected area? I'm about 50mi southeast in Tensas Parish, and LWFD has asked Tensas, Madison, and East Carroll parishes to curtail feeding. This is the first I've read to not consume deer meat. I hate to throw away 5 fucking deer from this year.

Big Dog, Georgia doesn't have any confirmed cases of CWD.

being that symptoms don't appear for 1-2 years, and the disease is absorbed into the ground from dead carcasses, then into the local browse...and remains contaminated for 5-10 years.... we're fucked. I hope they allow us to send samples out for testing. 

crock of fucking shit.

 

@Bigdaddydog1

@bbqit

I’m in it but I’m the most north. Shirley county is in it but Washington co is next to me

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/13/2018 at 9:19 PM, Bigdaddydog1 said:

ept. of Health warns against eating deer meat in counties affected by CWD

Tuesday, February 13th 2018, 2:50 pm ESTTuesday, February 13th 2018, 3:58 pm EST
Posted by Morgan Howard, Digital Content Producer
CONNECT
 
 
  •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
 
 
Source: WLBTSource: WLBT
HINDS COUNTY, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

The Mississippi Department of Health is telling people not to eat the deer meat in counties possibly affected by Chronic Wasting Disease.

This disease is found in white tailed deer. A white-tailed deer in Issaquena County tested positive for the disease on January 25.

Effectively immediately, supplemental feeding is banned in the following counties:  Claiborne, Hinds, Issaquena, Sharkey, Warren, and Yazoo

RELATED: Chronic Wasting Disease confirmed in a Mississippi white-tailed deer

Chronic Wasting Disease is a disease found in the brain and nervous system in deer, elk, moose and other members of the deer family. It is similar to "mad cow" disease and is always deadly when it infects an animal.

So far, this disease only affects animals and not humans. However, health officials say it could be spread to people if they ate an infected deer.

That's why the health department is warning people in these affected counties to avoid eating deer meat. 

As a precaution, the CDC now recommends that hunters harvesting deer from areas with reported CWD should strongly consider having those animals tested before eating the meat.  However, CWD cannot be positively detected in muscle tissue such as processed meat. 

To be as safe as possible and prevent human exposure, health officials say that hunters should consider not eating venison from deer harvested within the CWD Management Zone as defined by the Mississippi Department of Wildlife Fisheries, and Parks.

Here are the guidelines from the Mississippi Department of Health.

  • Do not shoot, handle or eat meat from a deer that appears sick.
  • Wear latex or rubber gloves when field dressing your deer.
  • Bone out the meat from your animal. Don’t saw through bone, and avoid cutting through the brain or spinal cord (backbone).
  • Minimize the handling of brain and spinal tissues.
  • Wash hands and instruments thoroughly after field dressing is completed.
  • Avoid consuming brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils and lymph nodes of harvested animals. (Normal field dressing coupled with boning out a carcass will remove most, if not all, of these body parts. Cutting away all fatty tissue will remove remaining lymph nodes.)
  • Avoid consuming the meat from any animal that tests positive for the disease.
  • If you have your deer commercially processed, request that your animal is processed individually, without meat from other animals being added to meat from your animal.

For more information regarding CWD in Mississippi, call the Department at (601) 432-2199.

Copyright 2018 MSNewsNow. All rights reserv

How can they tell if the average Mississippian has it or not?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Herchel said:

How can they tell if the average Mississippian has it or not?

I have no idea, but I would assume they would be sick and have some of the above symptoms

1 hour ago, Herchel said:

How can they tell if the average Mississippian has it or not?

I had never heard of this before

Edited by Bigdaddydog1
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Bigdaddydog1 said:

I have no idea, but I would assume they would be sick and have some of the above symptoms

I had never heard of this before

It’s been around for a while. Hit northern states first. Just like pigweed

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Bigdaddydog1 said:

I have no idea, but I would assume they would be sick and have some of the above symptoms

I had never heard of this before

I guess that went right over your head.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Herchel said:

How can they tell if the average Mississippian has it or not?

If they don't act like Georgia fans, it's assumed they don't have it...

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Noah said:

The black panthers have invaded Franklin County Tennessee.   This photo was taken by home security in Alto last week.

BLACK PANTHER.jpg

We had those in the Okefenokee when I was a kid.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0